Sylvia Pankhurst, artist and suffragette

Guest post by Jacqueline Mulhallen Sylvia – a play about Sylvia Pankhurst written and performed by Jacqueline Mulhallen, directed by William Alderson, and produced by Lynx Theatre and Poetry Sylvia Pankhurst is perhaps less well-known than her mother Emmeline and sister Christabel who were the leaders of the Women’s Social and Political Union (WSPU),but she did at least as much as they did, and perhaps more, to get votes for women. Sylvia was a very talented artist who won scholarships to Manchester School of Art and later to study in Venice and at the Royal College of Art, but she gave … Continue reading Sylvia Pankhurst, artist and suffragette

Robes and Ritual: Preparations for Women’s Arrival in the House of Lords

Guest post by Duncan Sutherland Background  Prior to a debate on a motion to admit women to the House of Lords in 1930, the newly-created Lord Noel-Buxton was introduced. The introduction ceremony involved the new peer and his two supporters (current members of the House) wearing bicorn hats and scarlet robes trimmed with gold and miniver, processing behind Garter King of Arms and the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod. He presented his Letters Patent (creating his peerage) and the Writ of Summons summoning him to parliament, which were read aloud. After taking the oath and signing the Roll, Lord … Continue reading Robes and Ritual: Preparations for Women’s Arrival in the House of Lords

Suffrage in the Spotlight

Guest post by Naomi Paxton Here at Vote 100 we often get emails from performers and playwrights who want to write about the suffrage movement, and to share the stories and voices of suffragists and suffragettes and their campaign for the vote. This is particularly exciting for me, as my doctoral research was all about the support given to the movement by the professional theatre industry, and in particular the Actresses’ Franchise League (AFL), founded in 1908. The AFL were neutral regarding suffrage tactics and supported all other societies regardless of their stance on militancy, which meant that members appeared … Continue reading Suffrage in the Spotlight

Embroideries made by Suffragettes in Prison, 1905-1914

Guest post by Denise Jones Recently Lockdales the auctioneers in Suffolk, very kindly sent me an image of objects belonging to the suffragette Mary Aldham, which were sold at auction in September 2015. Included in the cache were a small sampler and bag, both embroidered in Holloway c. 1912. It is likely that the embroideries had been treasured as family possessions for over a hundred years. The find has given me fresh hope that other similar ‘cloths’ may have been saved in other family homes. Sadly, I have been unable to locate the Aldham embroideries and only have virtual images … Continue reading Embroideries made by Suffragettes in Prison, 1905-1914

Jane Campbell: Parliamentary divorce pioneer — The History of Parliament

On 23 June 1801, a woman called Jane Campbell divorced her husband Edward Addison by Act of Parliament, and became the first woman to obtain a Parliamentary divorce. Dr Mari Takayanagi, Senior Archivist at the Parliamentary Archives and joint Project Manager for Vote 100, discusses how this came about, the significance of the case, and investigates who […] via Jane Campbell: Parliamentary divorce pioneer — The History of Parliament Continue reading Jane Campbell: Parliamentary divorce pioneer — The History of Parliament

New Dawn

Welcome to New Dawn artist Mary Branson’s Artist-in-Residence diary. New Dawn is a light sculpture commemorating the campaign for votes for women in Parliament. Unveiled in June 2016, it is part of the Parliamentary Art Collection. The artwork developed from Mary’s period as Artist-in-Residence to Women’s Suffrage in the Houses of Parliament in 2014. During her six-month […] via Welcome! — New Dawn Continue reading New Dawn

The Eligibility of Constance Markievicz

Originally posted on The History of Parliament:
On 14th December 1918, Countess Constance Markievicz (1868-1927) became the first woman to be elected to the UK Parliament, but she did not take her seat. Dr Mari Takayanagi, Senior Archivist at the Parliamentary Archives  and joint Project Manager for Vote 100  discusses how this came about and whether she would in fact have been eligible to be an MP. In 1918, the Representation of the People Act allowed some women over the age of 30 to vote in Parliamentary elections for the first time, and the Parliament (Qualification of Women) Act allowed… Continue reading The Eligibility of Constance Markievicz